KAISARA WALTON WRITES — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to China some six weeks ago certainly set a positive tone internationally.  At the same time, though, it marked China’s continual growth on the world stage. That’s good for Japan, and China, perhaps. But shouldn’t the United States be concerned?

During his visit. Abe told Xi, “We are neighbors; we’re partners who will cooperate with each other, rather than be a threat to each other.

China’s President, Xi Jinping, as well as the greater Chinese Communist Party (CCP), benefit most from this newfound friendship, and it looks like Asia at large can succeed without the United States.  

But is it good for the Chinese people? Just two weeks before Mr. Abe’s visit, China legalized internment camps for its Uighur Muslim minority. Vocal outcries have flooded the internet and social media sites. But condemnation from the international community has been sparse.

Mr. Abe’s cooperative spirit shouldn’t come as a surprise. Having instigated a trade war with China, the US must face the fact that senior allies like Japan are looking elsewhere for cooperation and international stability. This is sad. Historically, Japan has been one of America’s strongest allies. American policymakers should be concerned – one of their country ’s biggest “frenemies” – is cozying up to one of their most trusted allies.

This bilateral China-Japan love story shows that in international politics, friends can become enemies, and that America’s hegemonic status may gradually decline.  

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